Using social software to reinvent the customer relationship

27. August 2009

Posted by Dion Hinchcliffe @ 12:11 pm, Aug. 18

The elimination of decades of inadequate communication channels will suddenly unleash a tide of many opportunities, as well as challenges, for most organizations.As Web 2.0 applications move more deeply into the strategic operations of enterprises, a unique hybrid of social software has emerged to help businesses deal with the giant sea of customers that awaits them on the other side of the network. While Enterprise 2.0 tools, primarily aimed at collaboration, are certainly part of this story, they often don’t help companies enjoy the full range of possibilities when it comes customer-facing social computing. Read the rest of this entry »

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14 Reasons Why Enterprise 2.0 Projects Fail

27. August 2009

Posted by Dion Hinchcliffe @ 12:03 pm

Creating and nurturing a community is not something at which traditional stakeholders in software projects are often skilled. I’ve been having some very interesting conversations lately about Enterprise 2.0 failures with ZDNet colleague Michael Krigsman. He is doing research for his work on project failures in this area and is trying to understand the reasons why some Enterprise 2.0 initiatives don’t succeed. In preparing for our talk together, I ended up doing quite a bit of my own research and the results, at least for me, surfaced some fascinating stories and insights that are worth examining examining here in detail. Read the rest of this entry »


Is the Social Sector Capitalism’s R&D Lab?

26. August 2009

 25. August 2009, 19:31:32 | Ais dem Blog vonChris Meyer & Julia Kirby:

Students of Clay Christensen’s work are familiar with his insight that “disruptive innovation” usually has its genesis in spots where the “important” people aren’t looking, whether that’s down-market, offshore, in small or specialized segments, or wherever. The non-profit world is just such a place — it’s the land that business forgot. And within it people like Jacqueline Novogratz are borrowing from every toolkit available, and creating their own tools as well, to construct better solutions. Read the rest of this entry »


Organized Religion’s ‘Management Problem’

26. August 2009

Aus Gary Hamel’s Blog im WSJ:

Freitag, 21. August 2009, 21:28:48 | Gary Hamel

“What’s wrong with organized religion?” That’s the question I addressed at a recent conference organized by Willow Creek Community Church in Barrington, Illinois. For nearly 30 years, Willow Creek has been one of America’s most progressive churches, and since 1999 it’s been running an annual a seminar for church leaders from around the world. The “Leadership Summit” features innovative pastors as well as non-church speakers. This year’s roster included Carly Fiorina, Bono, Tony Blair, Jessica Jackley, co-founder of Kiva, and a slightly nerdish business school professor.

So there I was, in front of 7,000 preachers and laymen, with another 60,000 or so by satellite. I’m used to flashing my PowerPoints in front people who are richer, smarter and more powerful than me. But this was the first time I had to face a stadium’s worth of folks who were probably more virtuous than me. It wasn’t so much a case of Daniel in the lion’s den as Gary in the Christians’ den. (By the way, I donated my small honorarium to charity).

Obviously, no one dragged me on stage in chains. I went for two reasons. First, I believe that religious institutions, like other sorts of organizations, need a management reboot, and I know a little bit about how to make this happen. My hypothesis: the problem with organized religion isn’t that it’s too religious, but that it’s too organized. And second, I believe that the “church” (in the broadest, ecumenical sense of the word) plays an essential role in constructing the moral foundations of a democratic society—a view advanced 147 years ago by that famous French tourist, Alexis de Tocqueville: Read the rest of this entry »


Paul Laudicina of A.T. Kearney: Rethinking Outsourcing

24. August 2009

aus der aktuellen Business Week über die Zukunft der “Reset Economy”:

Maria Bartiromo talks to the consulting firm chairman about rethinking outsourcing

By Maria Bartiromo

Whether we are truly emerging from recession—as a Wall Street Journal survey of economists and other reports contend—or are setting ourselves up for another reversal, one thing seems clear: When the global economy awakes from its long nightmare, there will be “a new normal.” In short, it won’t be business as usual. To get a sense of the changes afoot, I talked with Paul Laudicina, chairman of the worldwide consulting firm A.T. Kearney and an expert in business strategy.

MARIA BARTIROMO

What kinds of changes—for both countries and companies—do you see coming out of all this turmoil? Read the rest of this entry »


“An emotional, social, economic reset”

24. August 2009

“This economic crisis doesn’t represent a cycle. It represents a reset,” Jeff Immelt, the CEO of General Electric, said today. “It’s an emotional, social, economic reset.”

And the biggest impact of this “reset” will be greater government involvement in the economy, and in the affairs of business, for better or worse.

“People who understand that will prosper,” Immelt said. “Those who don’t will be left behind.” Read the rest of this entry »


What´s Your Lifeline for Innovation?

19. August 2009

Hm, I rarely do watch TV, but “Who Wants to be a Millionaire?” is kind of addictive… I came across Stephen´s tweets – and it gives some refreshing input on the show 🙂

by Stephen Shapiro

During dinner the other night, I compared crowdsourcing to the lifelines on “Who Wants to be a Millionaire?”

Imagine you are sitting in the hot seat. The show’s host asks you a question. You are nervous and can’t think straight. You believe you know the answer to the question, but $64,000 is on the line. You are no longer that sure of yourself. You have all of your lifelines. What do you do?

A. Answer the question on your own.
B. Phone a Friend
C. Use the Fifty-Fifty
D. Ask the Audience

Let’s explore each option…
Read the rest of this entry »