The Underwear Bomber: Why They Didn’t “Connect the Dots”

10. January 2010

 January 8, 2010, Tom Davenport (the most authoratitive author about “Competing on analytics”)  

Everybody, including President Obama, is criticizing the U.S. intelligence agencies for not keeping accused underwear bomber Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab off the Christmas Day flight from Amsterdam to Detroit. Why didn’t they “connect the dots” or “put the pieces together”? This is the same problem the intelligence agencies encountered with 9/11 — lots of clues that were not integrated in time.

But is this really a fair criticism? Just how easy is it to connect the dots? Granted, there were numerous indications of Abdulmutallab’s evil intent. But it would have been difficult to put them together before the flight. Combining disparate pieces of information about people — whether they are customers or terrorists — is akin to solving a complex jigsaw puzzle. And in defense of the intelligence agencies, hardly anybody — in either the public or private sectors — does it well.

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Management’s Dirty Little Secret

10. January 2010

By Gary Hamel

How would you feel about a physician who killed more patients than he helped? What about a police detective who committed more murders than he solved? Or a teacher whose students were more likely to get dumber than smarter as the school year progressed? And what if you discovered that these perverse outcomes were more the rule than the exception—that they were characteristic of most doctors, policemen and professors? You’d be more than perplexed. You’d be incensed, outraged. You’d demand that something must be done!

Given this, why are we complacent when confronted with data that suggest most managers are more likely to douse the flames of employee enthusiasm than fan them, and are more likely to frustrate extraordinary accomplishment than to foster it?

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