The Biggest Mistakes CEOs Make With Their Personal Facebook Accounts

31. May 2016

Date: 31-05-2016
Source: The Wall Street Journal

No. 1: Having a passive presence, or none at all

CEOs can’t approach Facebook the way other professionals do.

Facebook ccCompanies know that Facebook is the most important social network for reaching consumers. That’s because 73% of Americans use Facebook every day, compared with 27% who use Twitter that much and just 17% who look at LinkedIn every day, according to a recent survey by Springboard America, a market research provider.

For the same reason, Facebook is a crucial platform for the leaders of those companies: When social-media usage is so overwhelmingly skewed toward Facebook, CEOs can’t afford to limit their professional online presence to what some might consider the more serious networks of Twitter and LinkedIn.

However, CEOs can’t approach Facebook the way other professionals or even other managers do. As the public face of their companies, CEOs are subject to far greater scrutiny both internally and externally. That gives them unique opportunities on Facebook—but also distinctive risks. Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

The Rise of Knowledge Workers Is Accelerating Despite the Threat of Automation

5. May 2016

Date: 05-05-2016
Source: The Wall Street Journal

Occupations with cognitive tasks that aren’t routine are adding the most jobs in decades.

The number of people in knowledge work jobs—that is, nonroutine cognitive occupations,has more than doubled in the last 30 years and there’s no sign of it slowing down.

In the past three decades, the number of jobs for knowledge workers has never been rising as quickly as it is right now.

As recently as the mid-1980s, you could categorize American workers into roughly three equal-sized groups of about 30 million people each. About 31 million people had nonroutine cognitive jobs, what is often called “knowledge work,” consisting of varied intellectual tasks such as professional, managerial or technical occupations. Just under 30 million people had jobs that consisted primarily of routine manual work—on assembly lines or in warehouses, doing physical tasks day after day. About 30 million people had jobs consisting of routine office work—bookkeepers, filing clerks,  bank tellers and so on—work that doesn’t involve much physical activity but is highly routine and doesn’t necessarily require high levels of knowledge. A fourth, smaller group, did nonroutine manual tasks, such as many service occupations.

But over the past three decades, almost all job growth has come from the two categories of work that are nonroutine. Meanwhile, routine jobs have been under a lot of pressure, especially during periods of recession. Read the rest of this entry »


Tim Cook: Reports of Apple’s Death a ‘Huge Overreaction’

4. May 2016

Date: 04-05-2016

Source: TIME

 

Cook CCThe Apple CEO is on the defensive as iPhone sales are falling

Apple CEO Tim Cook believes the negative sentiment around his company lately is overblown.

Speaking with CNBC’s Jim Cramer, Cook defended Apple’s performance after billionaire investor Carl Icahn sold his position in the company. “I think that’s a huge overreaction,” Cook said. “We just had an incredible quarter by absolute standards.”

Icahn’s move was largely due to Apple’s lagging performance in China, the investor told CNBC. The Cupertino, Calif. company revealed in its most recent earnings report that its revenue there, its second-biggest market, fell by 26%. Still, Cook told Cramer that he “could not be more optimistic about China.”

Apple’s iPhone sales, down 16%, also disappointed Wall Street analysts in the most recent quarter. Additionally, the firm offered a less rosy view of its future than analysts expected. “It was a pretty good quarter,” said Cook. “But not up to the street’s expectations clearly.” Read the rest of this entry »