What it takes to be a CEO in the 2020s

7. February 2020

Date: 06‑02‑2020

Source: The Economist

The rules of management are being ripped up. Bosses need to adapt

On paper this is a golden age for bosses. Chief executives have vast power. The 500 people who run America’s largest listed firms hold sway over 26m staff. Profits are high and the economy is purring. The pay is fantastic: the median of those ceos pockets $13m a year. Sundar Pichai at Alphabet has just got a deal worth up to $246m by 2023. The risks are tolerable: your chances of being fired or retiring in any year are about 10%. ceos often get away with a dreadful performance. In April Ginni Rometty will stand down from ibm after eight years in which Big Blue’s shares have trailed the stockmarket by 202%. Adam Neumann got high in private jets and lost $4bn before being ousted from WeWork last year. The only big drawback is all those meetings, which eat up two‑thirds of the typical boss’s working hours.

Yet ceos say the job has got harder. Most point the finger at “disruption”, the idea that competition is more intense. But they have been saying that for years. In fact the evidence suggests that, as America’s economy has become more sclerotic, big firms have been able to count on cranking out high profits for longer. Nonetheless, bosses are right that something has changed. The nature of the job is being disrupted. In particular, ceos’ mechanism for exercising control over their vast enterprises is failing, and where and why firms operate is in flux. That has big implications for business, and for anyone climbing the corporate ladder. Read the rest of this entry »


The Biggest Mistakes CEOs Make With Their Personal Facebook Accounts

31. May 2016

Date: 31-05-2016
Source: The Wall Street Journal

No. 1: Having a passive presence, or none at all

CEOs can’t approach Facebook the way other professionals do.

Facebook ccCompanies know that Facebook is the most important social network for reaching consumers. That’s because 73% of Americans use Facebook every day, compared with 27% who use Twitter that much and just 17% who look at LinkedIn every day, according to a recent survey by Springboard America, a market research provider.

For the same reason, Facebook is a crucial platform for the leaders of those companies: When social-media usage is so overwhelmingly skewed toward Facebook, CEOs can’t afford to limit their professional online presence to what some might consider the more serious networks of Twitter and LinkedIn.

However, CEOs can’t approach Facebook the way other professionals or even other managers do. As the public face of their companies, CEOs are subject to far greater scrutiny both internally and externally. That gives them unique opportunities on Facebook—but also distinctive risks. Read the rest of this entry »


Research Watch: The Economics Edge

1. November 2010
Noch ärger: und das bei der Performance der Ökonomen im letzten Jahrzehnt (Finanzkrise etc.). hfk
Economics isn’t a popular major: Just 1.6% of grads earned a degree in the discipline in 2006. But according to a 2010 study byPatricia M. Flynn and Michael A. Quinn of Bentley University, economics majors are disproportionately overrepresented among S&P 500 CEOs—which suggests that, historically at least, it’s the major that offers the best probability of reaching the corner office. Business administration majors, for instance, were only 39% as likely as economics majors to become chief executives.
Aus der Harvard Business Review Nov 2010