In The Future We’ll All Have Multiple Jobs

1. June 2016

Date: 01-06-2016
Source: FastCompany

Robots may replace us at menial tasks, but we are more likely to be moonlighting to advance our careers in the future.

The latest report from Adobe reveals that a majority (70%) of U.S. office workers report loving their jobs. In fact, they love work so much, they spend a lot of off hours thinking about it, and are likely to have a second job to help them improve the first.

This love fest stands in sharp contrast to several recent reports. According to Gallup’s most recent count, only 32.2% of respondents say they are engaged at work, while a recent study by the Marcus Buckingham Company, a management consultancy, found only 19% of U.S. employees reported being involved, enthusiastic, and committed.

Adobe’s findings, titled “Work in Progress,” were the result of surveying just over 1,000 U.S. office workers. The survey gauged their sentiments about the future of work. Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

Inside Mark Zuckerberg’s Bold Plan For The Future Of Facebook

16. November 2015

Fast Company, 16/11

http://www.fastcompany.com/3052885/mark-zuckerberg-facebook

Zuckerberg Facebook bold futurre

 


GOOGLE’S SECRET STRATEGY TO RECRUIT ENGINEERS

31. August 2015

Date: 29-08-2015
Source: Fast Company

GIVEN THE VAST AMOUNTS OF DATA GOOGLE HAS ON US THROUGH OUR SEARCHES, IT’S A WONDER THEY HAVEN’T DONE THIS SOONER.

It’s been the subject of a feature film, a main theme of a best-selling book, a source of endless speculation and analysis (yielding 21 million results on the search “how google hires”), and a holy grail-like quest for some two million hopefuls per year.

It’s the hiring process at Google.

While the search giant has been known to deploy quirky recruitment tactics, from banners and billboards blazed with a mathematical riddle aimed to entice engineers or the brainteasers about golf balls or school buses. The latter tactics, admitted Google’s head of people operations, Laszlo Bock, were “a complete waste of time,” while the former didn’t net the company any new hires. Read the rest of this entry »


FROM PASSION TO PROFIT: HOW TO MAKE MONEY DOING WHAT YOU LOVE

4. May 2015

Date: 04-05-2015

Source: FastCompany

THESE PEOPLE USED TECHNOLOGY TO TURN THEIR PASSIONS INTO CAREERS. HERE’S WHAT THEY LEARNED ALONG THE WAY.

When Derek Fagerstrom was growing up, creative young people wanted to do anything but go into business: They wanted to start a band, write a screenplay, or paint murals. But the world has changed. “We’re seeing a totally different approach to business,” says Fagerstrom, who is now 39. “People no longer think of business as the antithesis of art, but as an opportunity to express their vision.”

PEOPLE NO LONGER THINK OF BUSINESS AS THE ANTITHESIS OF ART, BUT AS AN OPPORTUNITY TO EXPRESS THEIR VISION. 

Over the past two decades, Fagerstrom has started a range of small businesses together with his wife, Lauren Smith, based on their shared passions and hobbies. Among many other ventures, they opened a San Francisco store called The Curiosity Shoppe, where they curated the work of their artist friends; launched a live event series called Pop-Up Magazine; and rehabilitated a quaint movie theater in Russian River, California. Fagerstrom considers these projects his creative contribution to the world.  Read the rest of this entry »


THE 5 THINGS THAT SEPARATE TRUE LEADERS FROM MANAGERS

15. March 2015

Date: 15-03-2015
Source: FastCompany

YES, THERE IS A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN MANAGING AND LEADING, AND UNDERSTANDING IT CAN ONLY SERVE YOU, YOUR BUSINESS, AND YOUR EMPLOYEES WELL.

Do you think leadership and management mean the same thing? If you do, keep reading—knowing the difference will make your job more fun, boost your staff’s morale, and could even make you more money.

The mistake many entrepreneurs make as their companies grow is focusing on how to manage their workers. They devise elaborate ways for teams to collaborate and communicate, dream up long- and short-term goals to set checkpoints and monitor when and how they are met, and focus intensely on office infrastructure.

In this all-too-common rush to expand bosses often forget to develop their leadership strategy. A more nebulous concept, leadership refers to the higher-level thinking: What are our overall goals? How would my ideal representative present himself? And how can I make it second nature for my employees to embody that model? Read the rest of this entry »


THE GIG ECONOMY WON’T LAST BECAUSE IT’S BEING SUED TO DEATH

18. February 2015

Date: 17-02-2015
Source: Fast Company

If Uber, Lyft, and others don’t stop relying on contract workers, business could crumble. Is it time for a new definition of employee?

When Vilma and Greta Zenelaj came across a Craigslist job ad that promised they could make as much as $22 an hour and get paid fast, it seemed like a good deal. The Albanian sisters had moved to Santa Monica to get a foothold in the film industry, and though they had produced a few independent features, they had run out of savings before they could also make a living. Now they were desperate to pay their bills.

Handy (then Handybook), the company that posted the Craigslist ad, is best known as a cleaning service. But unlike Merry Maids or your local cleaning franchise, it doesn’t actually employ any cleaners. Instead, it relies on an army of independent contractors to complete jobs, taking a 15% to 20% commission of every hour worked. It’s part of the “gig economy,” a much-hyped new class of the service industry where workers are expected to operate like mini-businesses. The influence of these companies is growing: according to an analysis by Greylock Partners, the value of transactions over platforms such as car services Lyft and Uber, grocery delivery service Instacart, courier service Postmates, and others could grow as large as $10 billion this year.

IT WAS TRUE THAT WHEN THINGS WENT WRONG, THEY WERE RESPONSIBLE. Read the rest of this entry »


7 NEW HABITS OF HIGHLY SUCCESSFUL PEOPLE

29. December 2014

Date: 27-12-2014
Source: FastCompany

THESE HABITS AREN’T EASY, BUT THEY’RE WORTH LEARNING FOR THE NEW YEAR.

Working professionals now live in a time of unprecedented change and disruption—the only thing that we can predict for certain is that things will become even more uncertain and unpredictable going forward.

As a result, an entirely new set of success skills is needed to get ahead in such new and novel business environments. Following are seven all-new habits that highly successful people share—and seven ways you can apply them to continuously vault yourself ahead of the pack, regardless of what the future brings.

1. BECOME IRREPLACEABLE
Get on-the-job training, skills, capabilities, and insights that are hard to come by, and even more difficult to outsource. The more unique and value-adding your abilities, the more difficult it becomes to substitute others in your place.

As a simple example, you could be your company’s most innovative authority on product design, well-connected social media maven, or sought-after educator and mentor. If it can be done better, faster, and cheaper, rest assured it will. If others can easily be trained to perform your duties, be certain you’re in their crosshairs.

The solution to the problem is to make yourself indispensable in your workplace—the more painful and challenging it is to replace you, the less likely you are to be jettisoned.

2. CONSTANTLY GROW AND IMPROVE
Make education and professional development an ongoing mandate. Ask yourself: What types of talents, training, and educational experiences will be in demand tomorrow? Then purposefully seek out the opportunities you’ll need to get them today so you’ll be ready to greet the future before it comes knocking.

Also take a moment to think about where you want to be in your career, then work backwards, creating an action plan with specific, definable steps and milestones that can motivate you and help you get from here to there. Read the rest of this entry »