Intel’s New Mission: Find Fresh Uses for Its Famous Paranoia

15. August 2016

Date: 15-08-2016
Source: The New York Times

Kraznich CCBrian Krzanich, Intel’s chief executive, is scheduled to speak at the company’s Developer Forum in San Francisco this week.

Andy Grove, the renowned chief executive of Intel, who died in March, coined a phrase beloved in Silicon Valley: “Only the paranoid survive.”

That sounds cool, if you like your capitalism fierce. That idea, however, turns out to have some significant downsides.

Intel is the world’s biggest semiconductor company because when Mr. Grove was in charge, it dominated the personal computer industry and was an important player in the associated business in computer servers.

Today, the PC market is shrinking, hurting Intel’s profits. The server-chip industry is still strong, thanks to the rise of cloud computing at companies like Facebook and Google. Cloud companies engineer server chips in ways that make very powerful and flexible systems used by millions of people.

But Intel missed joining a number of other markets that did not look like the PC business, particularly smartphones. It is scrambling for a place in sensors (or what is called the internet of things), wireless networking, autonomous vehicles and other hot areas, as computing spreads from traditional computers to nearly every machine. Read the rest of this entry »


Former Intel CEO Andy Grove Dies at 79

22. March 2016

Date: 22-03-2016
Source: The Wall Street Journal

No cause of death immediately disclosed

Grove CCAndrew S. Grove, the Holocaust survivor who turned Intel Corp. into one of high tech’s most influential trendsetters, died at the age of 79.

No cause of death was immediately disclosed. Mr. Grove, who successfully fought a well-publicized battle against prostate cancer, had suffered from Parkinson’s disease in recent years.

The Hungarian-born executive, Time magazine’s Man of the Year in 1997, helped Intel weather a wrenching transition in the 1980s from supplying memory chips—a commodity product facing tough competition from Asia—into the dominant maker of microprocessors that serve as the calculating engines for most computers. Along the way, Mr. Grove helped turn Intel into one of the few consumer brands to emerge from the semiconductor industry.

“Probably no one person has had a greater influence in shaping Intel, Silicon Valley, and all we think about today in the technology world than Andy Grove,” said Pat Gelsinger, a longtime Intel manager who is now CEO of software maker VMware Inc. “I would not be where I am or who I am if it were not for the enormous influence of Andy as a mentor and friend for 30 years.” Read the rest of this entry »


Intel Fuels a Rebellion Around Your Data

20. May 2013

Date: 20-05-2013
Source: Technology Review

The world’s largest chip maker wants to see a new kind of economy bloom around personal data. 

Why It Matters: The economic importance of personal information has outstripped the legislation that governs it.

Data science and personal information are converging to shape the Internet’s most powerful and surprising consumer products.

Intel is a $53-billion-a-year company that enjoys a near monopoly on the computer chips that go into PCs. But when it comes to the data underlying big companies like Facebook and Google, it says it wants to “return power to the people.”

Intel Labs, the company’s R&D arm, is launching an initiative around what it calls the “data economy”—how consumers might capture more of the value of their personal information, like digital records of their their location or work history. To make this possible, Intel is funding hackathons to urge developers to explore novel uses of personal data. It has also paid for a rebellious-sounding website called We the Data, featuring raised fists and stories comparing Facebook to Exxon Mobil.

Intel’s effort to stir a debate around “your data” is just one example of how some companies—and society more broadly—are grappling with a basic economic asymmetry of the big data age: they’ve got the data, and we don’t. Read the rest of this entry »


Intel’s Andy Grove on manufacturing in America

12. November 2010

  Date: 08-11-2010
 Source: CNET

 Among the scores of fabless chip companies and product design houses in Silicon Valley, Intel is a standout. It’s an American high-tech company that not only creates but builds some of the most sophisticated tech products in the world here. That contrasts with others, like Apple and Hewlett-Packard, that consign virtually all product manufacturing and assembly abroad. 

 

Last week, I asked Intel co-founder Andy Grove how the chipmaker became one of the last, great high-tech manufacturing giants in the U.S. and why many Silicon Valley icons haven’t done the same. Grove was Intel’s chairman from May 1997 to May 2005 and served as chief executive from 1987 to 1998.

Intel’s manufacturing strategy was underscored by a recent announcement to invest as much as $8 billion in new factories and facilities in the U.S. That’s in addition to the roughly $34 billion it has already invested in its U.S. factories, including investment in a joint flash chip manufacturing venture with Micron Technology.
Read the rest of this entry »