How a little open source project came to dominate big data

1. July 2014

Date: 01-07-2014
Source: Fortune

It began as a nagging technical problem that needed solving. Now, it’s driving a market that’s expected to be worth $50.2 billion by 2020.

There are countless open source projects with crazy names in the software world today, but the vast majority of them never make it onto enterprises’ collective radar. Hadoop is an exception of pachydermic proportions.

Named after a child’s toy elephant, Hadoop is now powering big data applications at companies such as Yahoo and Facebook; more than half of the Fortune 50 use it, providers say.

The software’s “refreshingly unique approach to data management is transforming how companies store, process, analyze and share big data,” according to Forrester analyst Mike Gualtieri. “Forrester believes that Hadoop will become must-have infrastructure for large enterprises.”

Globally, the Hadoop market was valued at $1.5 billion in 2012; by 2020, it is expected to reach $50.2 billion.

It’s not often a grassroots open source project becomes a de facto standard in industry. So how did it happen?

‘A market that was in desperate need’

“Hadoop was a happy coincidence of a fundamentally differentiated technology, a permissively licensed open source codebase and a market that was in desperate need of a solution for exploding volumes of data,” said RedMonk cofounder and principal analyst Stephen O’Grady. “Its success in that respect is no surprise.” Read the rest of this entry »


Sharing Secrets to Innovate More Profitably

4. February 2011

   Date: 04-02-2011
 Source: Technology Review
 
Offering your best ideas to others may sound like bad business. But it’s better than keeping them under wraps, explains Henry Chesbrough, the father of open innovation.

In the world of technology, new ideas rule. But that doesn’t mean companies should keep their research labs under lock and key. Henry Chesbrough, a professor at the Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley, has spent years documenting the benefits of “open innovation.” Chesbrough recently told Tom Simonite, Technology Review’s IT editor for hardware and software, why it works.

Technology Review: What is open innovation?

Chesbrough: It’s the idea that companies should make greater use of external ideas and technologies in their own business and allow their own technologies and ideas to be used by others in their business. The term originated in 2003 when I published my first book on the topic. Read the rest of this entry »


Just Doing It

19. April 2010

    Date: 18-04-2010

  Source: THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN, NYT 

You’ve heard that saying: As General Motors goes, so goes America. Thank goodness that is no longer true. I mean, I wish the new G.M. well, but our economic future is no longer tied to its fate.

No, my new motto is: As EndoStim goes, so goes America

EndoStim is a little start-up I was introduced to on a recent visit to St. Louis. The company is developing a proprietary implantable medical device to treat acid reflux. I have no idea if the product will succeed in the marketplace. It’s still in testing. What really interests me about EndoStim is how the company was formed and is being run today. It is the epitome of the new kind of start-ups we need to propel our economy: a mix of new immigrants, using old money to innovate in a flat world. 

Read the rest of this entry »


How the Web OS has begun to reshape IT and business

15. September 2009

September 6th, 2009  by Dion Hinchcliffe @ 9:01 am

These days in the halls of IT departments around the world there is a growing realization that the next wave of outsourcing, things like cloud computing and crowdsourcing, are going to require responses that will forever change the trajectory of their current relationship with the business, or finally cause them to be relegated as a primarily administrative, keep-the-lights-on function.

IT is going to either have to get more strategic to the business or get out of the way.

Read the rest of this entry »


Why We Need Big Organizations

19. August 2009

Big institutions will become more relevant than ever—once they focus not just on efficiency but on providing platforms for individuals to systematically experiment, learn, and innovate

By John Hagel and John Seely Brown and Lang Davison

Posted on The Big Shift: August 11, 2009 8:29 AM

“Bye, bye, organization guy.” Those words start the first chapter in the estimable Daniel Pink’s Free Agent Nation, published in 2007. In that book, Pink observed how increasing numbers of people in the US are choosing to work as independent contractors, temps, and on a project-to-project basis.

Workers were leaving big corporations, Pink said, to get away from “unfulfilling jobs, dysfunctional workplaces, and dead-end careers.” As readers of our blog will recognize, we see this dysfunction as the inevitable result of the industrial-era model in which most of today’s big companies remain stuck. Read the rest of this entry »


Cloud computing and open source faceoff

13. July 2009

Cloud computing remains one of the big topics in software this year despite considerable and ongoing concerns over lock-in, lack of control, and security. The siren song of ease-of-development, reduced costs, highly elastic scalability, and next-generation architectures has many in IT and in the Web community carefully weighing the benefits and risks.

aus Dion Hinchcliffe’s Blog. Hinchcliffe Cloud Computing


Building Expertise Through Collective Innovation

23. March 2008

und wieder ein wunderbarer Artikel über Design & Innovation:

Building Expertise Through Collective Innovation: “The Raymond open-innovation conference gathered design managers from companies such as Heineken and Lego to share best practices and improve the bottom line.

by Florian M. Stieger