The Biggest Mistakes CEOs Make With Their Personal Facebook Accounts

31. May 2016

Date: 31-05-2016
Source: The Wall Street Journal

No. 1: Having a passive presence, or none at all

CEOs can’t approach Facebook the way other professionals do.

Facebook ccCompanies know that Facebook is the most important social network for reaching consumers. That’s because 73% of Americans use Facebook every day, compared with 27% who use Twitter that much and just 17% who look at LinkedIn every day, according to a recent survey by Springboard America, a market research provider.

For the same reason, Facebook is a crucial platform for the leaders of those companies: When social-media usage is so overwhelmingly skewed toward Facebook, CEOs can’t afford to limit their professional online presence to what some might consider the more serious networks of Twitter and LinkedIn.

However, CEOs can’t approach Facebook the way other professionals or even other managers do. As the public face of their companies, CEOs are subject to far greater scrutiny both internally and externally. That gives them unique opportunities on Facebook—but also distinctive risks. Read the rest of this entry »

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The disruptive power of collaboration: An interview with Clay Shirky

4. March 2014

How we collaborate has profound implications for how we live and work. The author and New York University professor explains how social media has upended traditional norms.

March 2014, McKinsey & Co.

Shirky

From the invention of the printing press to the telephone, the radio, and the Internet, the ways people collaborate change frequently, and the effects of those changes often reverberate through generations. In this video interview, Clay Shirky, author, New York University professor, and leading thinker on the impact of social media, explains the disruptive impact of technology on how people live and work—and on the economics of what we make and consume. This interview was conducted by McKinsey Global Institute partner Michael Chui, and an edited transcript of Shirky’s remarks follows.

Interview transcript

Sharing changes everything

The thing I’ve always looked at, because it is long-term disruptive, is changes in the way people collaborate. Because in the history of particularly the Western world, when communications tools come along and they change how people can contact each other, how they can share information, how they can find each other—we’re talking about the printing press, or the telephone, or the radio, or what have you—the changes that are left in the wake of those new technologies often span generations.

The printing press was a sustaining technology for the scientific revolution, the spread of newspapers, the spread of democracy, just on down the list. So the thing I always watch out for, when any source of disruption comes along, when anything that’s going to upset the old order comes along, is I look for what the collaborative penumbra is. Read the rest of this entry »


Measuring the full impact of digital capital

29. July 2013
McKinsey & Company
Article|McKinsey Quarterly

Although largely uncounted, intangible digital assets may hold an important key to understanding competition and growth in the Internet era.

July 2013| byJacques Bughin and James Manyika

On July 31, 2013, the US Bureau of Economic Analysis will release, for the first time, GDP figures categorizing research and development as fixed investment. It will join software in a new category called intellectual-property products.

In our knowledge-based economy, this is a sensible move that brings GDP accounting closer to economic reality. And while that may seem like an arcane shift relevant only to a small number of economists, the need for the change reflects a broader mismatch between our digital economy and the way we account for it. This problem has serious top-management implications.

To understand the mismatch, you need to understand what we call digital capital—the resources behind the processes key to developing new products and services for the digital economy. Digital capital takes two forms. The first is traditionally counted tangible assets, such as servers, routers, online-purchasing platforms, and basic Internet software. They appear as capital investment on company books. Yet a large and growing portion of what’s powering today’s digital economy consists of a second type of digital capital—intangible assets.

They are manifold: the unique designs that engage large numbers of users and improve their digital experiences; the digital capture of user behavior, contributions, and social profiles; the environments that encourage consumers to access products and services; and the intense big-data and analytics capabilities that can guide operations and business growth. They also include a growing range of new business models for monetizing digital activity, such as patents and processes that can be licensed for royalty income, and the brand equity that companies like Google or Amazon.com create through digital engagement. Read the rest of this entry »


Europe’s ‘Lost’ Tech $1 Trillion

3. June 2013

Date: 03-06-2013
Source: The Wall Street Journal

The annual publication of analyst Mary Meeker’s Internet Trends Report is something of an Internet tradition, providing a rich source of hard data over which much chin stroking will now take place.

Unveiled at the All Things D annual conference, the report shows two slides that stand out in particular for a European tech audience, highlighting just how much value, and how many jobs, have been “lost” in Europe by the families of founders finding the prospect of the U.S. more enticing than staying home; and as a consequence how little European web companies contribute to the global web economy.

In one slide Ms. Meeker, the Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers partner, lists 25 leading web companies by their country of origin and 2013 market value. Of the $1.38 billion in market value only an anaemic $20 billion comes from Europe. While Europe comprises just under 11% of the world’s population, the European companies on the list contribute just 1.5% by value. (And $16 billion of that comes from Russia — search engine OAO Yandex and portal Mail.ru Group Ltd. The U.K. retailer ASOS PLC contributes the remaining $4 billion.)

By contrast the U.S. contributed $1.17 billion or 85%. Americans comprise about 4.5% of the world’s population. Read the rest of this entry »


What Technologies Will Crowdfunding Create?

17. September 2012

Date: 17-09-2012
Source: Technology Review

Super-users, hobbyists, and gadget fans are investing in innovations they want, and creating a new generation of entrepreneurs along the way.

It’s becoming a common story. A project listed on Kickstarter, the Internet crowdfunding website, ends up wildly exceeding its financial goals. Suddenly, someone is in business.

That’s what happened to inventor Jay Silver, creator of MaKey MaKey, an “invention kit” consisting of a processor board and alligator clips that turns objects with high electrical resistance—bananas, Play-Doh, human flesh—into computer controllers. Silver listed the project on Kickstarter this year hoping to raise $25,000. He ended up with $568,106.

Since then, it’s been a race to negotiate with Chinese manufacturers, customs agents, and wholesalers to produce and ship what will be the first product of Silver’s newly incorporated company, JoyLabz. “I was going to start this company in a few years, but my crowdfunding success accelerated the timing,” says Silver, who is 33. Read the rest of this entry »


Mystery of Big Data’s Parallel Universe Brings Fear, and a Thrill

5. June 2012

Date: 05-06-2012
Source: The New York Times

Not long ago, a woman in Tacoma, Wash., received a suggestion from Facebook that she “friend” another woman. She didn’t know the other woman, but she followed through, as many of us have, innocently laying our cookie-crumb trails through cyberspace, only to get a surprise.

On the other woman’s profile page was a wedding picture — of her and the first woman’s husband, now exposed for all the cyberworld to see as a bigamist.

And so it goes in the era of what is called Big Data, in which more and more information about our lives — where we shop and what we buy, indeed where we are right now — the economy, the genomes of countless organisms we can’t even name yet, galaxies full of stars we haven’t counted, traffic jams in Singapore and the weather on Mars tumbles faster and faster through bigger and bigger computers down to everybody’s fingertips, which are holding devices with more processing power than the Apollo mission control. Big Data probably knows more about us than we ourselves do, but is there stuff that Big Data itself doesn’t know it knows? Big Data is watching us, but who or what is watching Big Data? Read the rest of this entry »


Big Data. Big Impact.

13. February 2012

Date: 12-02-2012

Source: Jim Baum Former CEO

I had the honor this week of speaking with Om Malik of GigaOm on stage at the Structure: Big Data event in New York City. This was a first of its kind event, bringing together an incredibly interesting group of entrepreneurs, enterprises, industry luminaries, investors and press to discuss the state of the “Big Data” revolution that manifests itself throughout the industry. I must say, I feel “vindicated” by all this activity. I have been talking for years about “category convergence”, suggesting the convergence of business analytics, data management, search, data warehousing, ETL, text analytics, data protection, and a few other “categories” as necessary to create the business value we all expect from these technologies.

Let’s go back in time. Historically, we have always talked about “structured data” and “unstructured data” as two, independent, separate things. That segregation is incredibly important as all this “data” is at the root of everything we are doing to make sense of it, improve business and societal decision-making, and create some type of sustainable value from this ever-increasing asset. Yet as a result of this thinking (or perhaps at the root of this dichotomy), the technologies to extract knowledge and insight from these data assets have evolved along largely separate paths. Think databases vs. search. Read the rest of this entry »